Andrew Reinmann, Ph.D.

  • Assistant Professor, Environmental Sciences Initiative
  • Assistant Professor of Geography, Hunter College

Dr. Andrew Reinmann is an ecologist and biogeochemist who focuses on plant ecophysiology and the terrestrial carbon cycle. He is particularly interested in understanding the effects of environmental change (e.g., climate change, urbanization, and land cover change) on the drivers of plant-mediated controls of terrestrial carbon cycling, and nitrogen dynamics as a limiting nutrient, across a continuum of human-disturbed ecosystems. His research draws from multiple disciplines and combines field observations, ecosystem experiments, and laboratory analyses with GIS, remote sensing, and modeling. Reinmann currently has projects in forested and human dominated landscapes throughout the mid-Atlantic and Northeastern U.S. For his latest CV, click here.

Prof. Reinmann welcomes the involvement of students, post-docs, and visiting scientists in the lab. Please contact him at areinmann@gc.cuny.edu if you are interested. He is actively looking for a Ph.D. student to start during summer/fall of 2019 — if interested, please click here.

In the Media

Syrup Is as Canadian as a Maple Leaf. That Could Change With the Climate.
May 3, 2019 | The New York Times

Study shows declining winter snowpack is hurting the sugar maple
February 13, 2019 | The Maple News

Not So Sweet: Climate Change Means Slow-Growing Sugar Maples, Study Finds
December 7, 2018 | NPR
December 3, 2018 | WBUR News

Climate change is shrinking winter snowpack, which harms Northeast forests year-round
December 3, 2018 | The Conversation

Living on the Edge
August 11, 2017 | Northern Woodlands

Publications

J.L. Harrison, A.B. Reinmann, A. Socci Maloney, N. Phillips, S.M. Juice, A.J. Webster, and P.H. Templer. Transpiration of Dominant Tree Species Varies in Response to Projected Changes in Climate: Implications for Composition and Water Balance of Temperate Forest Ecosystems. Ecosystems, 2020. DOI: 10.1007/s10021-020-00490-y.

A. Elmes, H. Alemohammad, R. Avery, K. Caylor, J.R. Eastman, L. Fishgold, M.A. Friedl, M. Jain, D. Kohli, J.C. Laso Bayas, D. Lunga, J.L. McCarty, R.G. Pontius Jr., A.B. Reinmann, J. Rogan, L. Song, H. Stoynova, S. Ye, Z.-F. Yi, and L. Estes. 2020. Accounting for training data error in machine learning applied to Earth observations. Remote Sensing, 2020. 12(6): 1034.

I.A. Smith, L.R. Hutyra, A.B. Reinmann, J.R. Thompson, and D.W. Allen. Evidence for edge enhancements of soil respiration in temperate forests. Geophysical Research Letters, 2019, 46, 8, 4278-4287. DOI: 10.1029/2019GL082459.

A.B. Reinmann, J.R. Susser, E.M.C. Demaria, and P.H. Templer. Declines in northern forest tree growth following snowpack decline and soil freezing. Global Change Biology, 2019, 25, 420-430. DOI: 10.1111/gcb.14420.

P.O. Sorenson, A.C. Finzi, M.-A. Giasson, A.B. Reinmann, R. Sanders-DeMott, and P.H. Templer. Winter soil freeze-thaw cycles lead to reductions in soil microbial biomass and activity not compensated for by soil warming. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 2018, 116, 39-47. DOI: 10.106/j.soilbio.2017.09.026.

I.A. Smith, L.R. Hutyra, A.B. Reinmann, J.K. Marrs, and J.R. Thompson. Piecing together the fragments: elucidating edge effects on forest carbon dynamics. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, 2018. DOI: 10.1002/fee.1793.

R. Sanders-DeMott, P.O. Sorensen, A.B. Reinmann, and P.H. Templer. Growing season warming and winter freeze-thaw cycles reduce root nitrogen uptake capacity and increase soil solution nitrogen in a northern forest ecosystem. Biogeochemistry, 2018, 137, 337-349. DOI: 10.1007/s10533-018-0422-5.

A.B. Reinmann and P.H. Templer. Increased soil respiration in response to experimentally reduced snow cover and increased soil freezing in a temperate deciduous forest. Biogeochemistry, 2018. DOI: 10.1007/s10533-018-0497-z

P.H. Templer, A.B. Reinmann, R. Sanders-DeMott, P.O. Sorensen, S.M. Juice, F. Bowles, L. Sofen, J.L. Harrison, I. Halm, L. Rustad, M.E. Martin, and N. Grant. Climate change across seasons experiment (CCASE): a new method for simulating future climate in seasonally snow-covered ecosystems. PloS ONE, 2017, 071928. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0171928. (PDF)

A.B Reinmann and L.R. Hutyra. Reply to Remy et al.: Local and global limitations to forest productivity as mediators of biogeochemical response to forest edge effects. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2017, 114, 34, E7033-E7034. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1712103114. (PDF)

A.B. Reinmann and L.R. Hutyra. Edge effects enhance carbon uptake and its vulnerability to climate change in temperate broadleaf forests. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2017, 114, 1, 107-112. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1612369114. (PDF)

headshot: andrew reinmann

Phone Number

212.413.3152